Self Help for Panic Attacks – Top Five Tips

If you are one of millions of Americans who is seeking help for panic attacks, you most likely spend an inordinate amount of time wondering about the effects of stress and remedies focused on calming nerves. There are many products on the market aimed at anxiety attack sufferers, but you may not need to go that route right away. Here are six surprisingly effective tips for "self helping" yourself to manage the effects of stress before they become full blown panic attacks.

Sleep Well. One of the most important things you can do for your overall health and well being is to get enough sleep. For most adults, that means between seven and eight hours minimum for calming nerves and counteracting the effects of stress on the body. Equally important to the quantity of sleep is the quality of sleep. If you are prone to night waking, try to identify and correct this problem. Some helpful suggestions for getting a quality night's sleep include white noise, no TV in the bedroom and limiting caffeine after a certain time in the late afternoon/early evening.

Eat Well. Eating well goes hand in hand with sleeping well. Often, if you are tired you are likely to make poor eating choices, which then drain your energy and make you feel tired. It becomes a vicious cycle. It is important to provide your body with the fuel it needs by eating the right mix of protein, complex carbohydrates and healthy fats. If you are eating right, then you are likely to feel good about yourself. Conversely, making poor food choices can contribute to weight gain, another of the unwanted effects of stress. These poor choices and bad body image, when added with other stressors, may lead to panic attacks.

Get Moving. Many of us don't think we have the time to exercise, but it doesn't have to be difficult or time consuming. Walking can begin calming nerves almost immediately, takes very little time and doesn't require any fancy gym equipment. When it comes to counteracting the effects of stress, exercise is a very powerful tool. And when it comes to exercise as a way of limiting or coping with stress, anything you do is better than nothing. So get up and go, especially when you begin to feel stressed out or out of control. You may be able to walk away from a panic attack – literally!

Find an Outlet. Maybe exercise isn't your thing. But find something that is that can help with calming your nerves. Sometimes it can be as simple as putting on a CD that relaxes you or puts you in a good mood. Figure out what makes you happiest and focus on it when you start to feel the effects of stress. Even if your outlet isn't available to you immediately, sometimes just remembering that you have one is enough. For example, many people get through the work day (or week, or month!) by reminding themselves how many days they have until vacation. Others keep mementos or trinkets that are "touchstones" as help for panic attacks.

Talk it Out. Having a trusted friend, partner or family member for support can be tremendous help for panic attacks. Knowing that you have someone to turn to prevents you from feeling isolated and out of control. Also, talking out an issue that is bothering you before the effects of stress get out of control can very effectively head off an anxiety attack.

Finding ways of calming nerves and counteracting the effects of stress are great help for panic attacks. The above five things, when practiced consistently and in concert with each other, can be very effective in controlling stress that would otherwise lead to panic attacks. If you feel that you need more than self-help for panic attacks, there are also a plethora of other options available beyond the basic steps outlined above.

Share

Speak Your Mind

*